Articles | Volume 15, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 10925–10938, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-10925-2015
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 10925–10938, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-15-10925-2015

Research article 01 Oct 2015

Research article | 01 Oct 2015

Influence of synoptic patterns on surface ozone variability over the eastern United States from 1980 to 2012

L. Shen et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Lu Shen on behalf of the Authors (30 Jul 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (02 Aug 2015) by Steven Brown
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 Aug 2015)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (25 Aug 2015)
ED: Reconsider after minor revisions (Editor review) (26 Aug 2015) by Steven Brown
AR by Lu Shen on behalf of the Authors (10 Sep 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (12 Sep 2015) by Steven Brown
AR by Lu Shen on behalf of the Authors (14 Sep 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
In this study, we have examined the effect of polar jet and Bermuda High on ozone air quality in the eastern United States. In the Midwest and northeast, the poleward shift of jet wind leads to reduced polar jet frequency, resulting in increased ozone there. In the southeast, the influence of Bermuda High on ozone variability depends on the location of its west edge. Westward movement increases the ozone only when the JJA Bermuda High west edge is located west of 85.4°W.
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