Articles | Volume 24, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1345-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1345-2024
Research article
 | 
30 Jan 2024
Research article |  | 30 Jan 2024

Source differences in the components and cytotoxicity of PM2.5 from automobile exhaust, coal combustion, and biomass burning contributing to urban aerosol toxicity

Xiao-San Luo, Weijie Huang, Guofeng Shen, Yuting Pang, Mingwei Tang, Weijun Li, Zhen Zhao, Hanhan Li, Yaqian Wei, Longjiao Xie, and Tariq Mehmood

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Latest update: 14 Apr 2024
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Short summary
PM2.5 are air pollutants threatening health globally, but they are a mixture of chemical compositions from many sources and result in unequal toxicity. Which composition from which source of PM2.5 as the most hazardous object is a question hindering effective pollution control policy-making. With chemical and toxicity experiments, we found automobile exhaust and coal combustion to be priority emissions with higher toxic compositions for precise air pollution control, ensuring public health.
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