Articles | Volume 24, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1231-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1231-2024
Research article
 | 
29 Jan 2024
Research article |  | 29 Jan 2024

Thermal infrared observations of a western United States biomass burning aerosol plume

Blake T. Sorenson, Jeffrey S. Reid, Jianglong Zhang, Robert E. Holz, William L. Smith Sr., and Amanda Gumber

Viewed

Total article views: 1,061 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
855 166 40 1,061 27 26
  • HTML: 855
  • PDF: 166
  • XML: 40
  • Total: 1,061
  • BibTeX: 27
  • EndNote: 26
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Jun 2023)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Jun 2023)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,061 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,024 with geography defined and 37 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 20 Apr 2024
Download
Short summary
Smoke particles are typically submicron in size and assumed to have negligible impacts at the thermal infrared spectrum. However, we show that infrared signatures can be observed over dense smoke plumes from satellites. We found that giant particles are unlikely to be the dominant cause. Rather, co-transported water vapor injected to the middle to upper troposphere and surface cooling beneath the plume due to shadowing are significant, with the surface cooling effect being the most dominant.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint