Articles | Volume 24, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1025-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1025-2024
Research article
 | 
24 Jan 2024
Research article |  | 24 Jan 2024

Significant human health co-benefits of mitigating African emissions

Christopher D. Wells, Matthew Kasoar, Majid Ezzati, and Apostolos Voulgarakis

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Short summary
Human-driven emissions of air pollutants, mostly caused by burning fossil fuels, impact both the climate and human health. Millions of deaths each year are caused by air pollution globally, and the future trends are uncertain. Here, we use a global climate model to study the effect of African pollutant emissions on surface level air pollution, and resultant impacts on human health, in several future emission scenarios. We find much lower health impacts under cleaner, lower-emission futures.
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