Articles | Volume 23, issue 22
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-14239-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-14239-2023
Research article
 | 
16 Nov 2023
Research article |  | 16 Nov 2023

The evolution of deep convective systems and their associated cirrus outflows

George Horner and Edward Gryspeerdt

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Latest update: 28 Feb 2024
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Short summary
Tropical deep convective clouds, and the thin cirrus (ice) clouds that flow out from them, are important for modulating the energy budget of the tropical atmosphere. This work uses a new method to track the evolution of the properties of these clouds across their entire lifetimes. We find these clouds cool the atmosphere in the first 6 h before switching to a warming regime after the deep convective core has dissipated, which is sustained beyond 120 h from the initial convective event.
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