Articles | Volume 22, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 8473–8495, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-8473-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 8473–8495, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-8473-2022
Research article
04 Jul 2022
Research article | 04 Jul 2022

Understanding aerosol composition in a tropical inter-Andean valley impacted by agro-industrial and urban emissions

Lady Mateus-Fontecha et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-601', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 Sep 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-601', Anonymous Referee #2, 06 Oct 2021
  • AC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-601', Lady Mateus, 23 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Lady Mateus on behalf of the Authors (24 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Feb 2022) by Alexander Laskin
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (25 Apr 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (26 Apr 2022) by Alexander Laskin
AR by Lady Mateus on behalf of the Authors (14 May 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 May 2022) by Alexander Laskin
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Short summary
This study reports the chemical composition of regionally representative PM2.5 in an area densely populated and substantially industrialized, located in the inter-Andean valley, with the highest sugarcane yield in the world and where sugarcane is burned and harvested year round. We found that sugarcane burning is not portrayed as a distinguishable sample composition component. Instead, the composition analysis revealed multiple associations among sugarcane burning components and other sources.
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