Articles | Volume 22, issue 11
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 7417–7442, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7417-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 7417–7442, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-7417-2022
Research article
 | Highlight paper
09 Jun 2022
Research article  | Highlight paper | 09 Jun 2022

Australian wildfire smoke in the stratosphere: the decay phase in 2020/2021 and impact on ozone depletion

Kevin Ohneiser et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-1097', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-1097', Anonymous Referee #2, 20 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kevin Ohneiser on behalf of the Authors (11 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 May 2022) by Yves Balkanski
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Executive editor
Wildfires have attracted increasing attention in recent years because of their effects on local air quality, as well as on regional and global climate. Ohneiser et al. documents with impressive accuracy the appearance of wildfire plumes in the stratosphere over Australia in 2020/2021, showing strong influence on stratospheric ozone. We recommend readers to read this paper together with Solomon et al. ("On the stratospheric chemistry of midlatitude wildfire smoke", PNAS 2022,https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2117325119). Both studies highlight the importance of wildfires for stratospheric chemistry and the recovery of the ozone layer in a warming climate.
Short summary
We present and discuss 2 years of long-term lidar observations of the largest stratospheric perturbation by wildfire smoke ever observed. The smoke originated from the record-breaking Australian fires in 2019–2020 and affects climate conditions and even the ozone layer in the Southern Hemisphere. The obvious link between dense smoke occurrence in the stratosphere and strong ozone depletion found in the Arctic and in the Antarctic in 2020 can be regarded as a new aspect of climate change.
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