Articles | Volume 22, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 5983–6000, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5983-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 5983–6000, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-5983-2022
Research article
06 May 2022
Research article | 06 May 2022

Siberian Arctic black carbon: gas flaring and wildfire impact

Olga B. Popovicheva et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Good and important paper, minor corrections and additions suggested', Anonymous Referee #3, 24 Jan 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Nikolaos Evangeliou, 09 Feb 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-867', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Jan 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Nikolaos Evangeliou, 10 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Nikolaos Evangeliou on behalf of the Authors (10 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Feb 2022) by Andreas Petzold
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (24 Feb 2022)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (03 Mar 2022) by Andreas Petzold
AR by Nikolaos Evangeliou on behalf of the Authors (03 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Measurements of black carbon (BC) combined with atmospheric transport modeling reveal that gas flaring from oil and gas extraction in Kazakhstan, Volga-Ural, Komi, Nenets and western Siberia contributes the largest share of surface BC in the Russian Arctic dominating over domestic, industrial and traffic sectors. Pollution episodes show an increasing trend in concentration levels and frequency as the station is in the Siberian gateway of the highest anthropogenic pollution to the Russian Arctic.
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