Articles | Volume 22, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1825-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1825-2022
Research article
 | 
08 Feb 2022
Research article |  | 08 Feb 2022

Simulated impacts of vertical distributions of black carbon aerosol on meteorology and PM2.5 concentrations in Beijing during severe haze events

Donglin Chen, Hong Liao, Yang Yang, Lei Chen, Delong Zhao, and Deping Ding

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Latest update: 11 Jun 2024
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Short summary
The black carbon (BC) vertical profile plays a critical role in BC–meteorology interaction, which also influences PM2.5 concentrations. More BC mass was assigned into high altitudes (above 1000 m) in the model, which resulted in a stronger cooling effect near the surface, a larger temperature inversion below 421 m, more reductions in PBLH, and a larger increase in near-surface PM2.5 in the daytime caused by the direct radiative effect of BC.
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