Articles | Volume 22, issue 16
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10937-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10937-2022
Research article
 | 
29 Aug 2022
Research article |  | 29 Aug 2022

Composition and reactivity of volatile organic compounds in the South Coast Air Basin and San Joaquin Valley of California

Shang Liu, Barbara Barletta, Rebecca S. Hornbrook, Alan Fried, Jeff Peischl, Simone Meinardi, Matthew Coggon, Aaron Lamplugh, Jessica B. Gilman, Georgios I. Gkatzelis, Carsten Warneke, Eric C. Apel, Alan J. Hills, Ilann Bourgeois, James Walega, Petter Weibring, Dirk Richter, Toshihiro Kuwayama, Michael FitzGibbon, and Donald Blake

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Latest update: 22 Apr 2024
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Short summary
California’s ozone persistently exceeds the air quality standards. We studied the spatial distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that produce ozone over the most polluted regions in California using aircraft measurements. We find that the oxygenated VOCs have the highest ozone formation potential. Spatially, biogenic VOCs are important during high ozone episodes in the South Coast Air Basin, while dairy emissions may be critical for ozone production in San Joaquin Valley.
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