Articles | Volume 22, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 1059–1079, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1059-2022
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 1059–1079, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-1059-2022
Research article
21 Jan 2022
Research article | 21 Jan 2022

A case study on the impact of severe convective storms on the water vapor mixing ratio in the lower mid-latitude stratosphere observed in 2019 over Europe

Dina Khordakova et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-749', Zhipeng Qu, 09 Oct 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-749', Anonymous Referee #2, 29 Oct 2021
  • AC1: 'Answers to acp-2021-749', Dina Khordakova, 29 Nov 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Dina Khordakova on behalf of the Authors (29 Nov 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (01 Dec 2021) by Farahnaz Khosrawi
AR by Dina Khordakova on behalf of the Authors (06 Dec 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Extreme storms transport humidity from the troposphere to the stratosphere. Here it has a strong impact on the climate. With ongoing global warming, we expect more storms and, hence, an enhancement of this effect. A case study was performed in order to measure the impact of the direct injection of water vapor into the lower stratosphere. The measurements displayed a significant transport of water vapor into the lower stratosphere, and this was supported by satellite and reanalysis data.
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