Articles | Volume 21, issue 12
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 9669–9679, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9669-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 9669–9679, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-9669-2021
Research article
 | Highlight paper
29 Jun 2021
Research article  | Highlight paper | 29 Jun 2021

Investigations on the anthropogenic reversal of the natural ozone gradient between northern and southern midlatitudes

David D. Parrish et al.

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Short summary
The few ozone measurements made before the 1980s indicate that industrial development increased ozone concentrations by a factor of ~ 2 at northern midlatitudes, which are now larger than at southern midlatitudes. This difference was much smaller, and likely reversed, in the pre-industrial atmosphere. Earth system models find similar increases, but not higher pre-industrial ozone in the south. This disagreement may indicate that modeled natural ozone sources and/or deposition loss are inadequate.
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