Articles | Volume 21, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6839–6855, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6839-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 6839–6855, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-6839-2021

Research article 05 May 2021

Research article | 05 May 2021

Dilution impacts on smoke aging: evidence in Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) data

Anna L. Hodshire et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (04 Aug 2020) by Manvendra K. Dubey
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (14 Aug 2020)
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (18 Aug 2020)  Author's response
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (04 Sep 2020) by Barbara Ervens
AR by Anna Hodshire on behalf of the Authors (10 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Feb 2021) by Barbara Ervens
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (23 Feb 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Mar 2021) by Barbara Ervens
AR by Anna Hodshire on behalf of the Authors (12 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 Mar 2021) by Barbara Ervens
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Short summary
Biomass burning emits particles and vapors that can impact both health and climate. Here, we investigate the role of dilution in the evolution of aerosol size and composition in observed US wildfire smoke plumes. Centers of plumes dilute more slowly than edges. We see differences in concentrations and composition between the centers and edges both in the first measurement and in subsequent measurements. Our findings support the hypothesis that plume dilution influences smoke aging.
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