Articles | Volume 21, issue 6
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4899–4913, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4899-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4899–4913, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4899-2021

Research article 30 Mar 2021

Research article | 30 Mar 2021

Observed trends in clouds and precipitation (1983–2009): implications for their cause(s)

Xiang Zhong et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Run Liu on behalf of the Authors (28 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Dec 2020) by Graham Feingold
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (14 Dec 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (15 Dec 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (24 Dec 2020) by Graham Feingold
AR by Run Liu on behalf of the Authors (01 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Feb 2021) by Graham Feingold
AR by Run Liu on behalf of the Authors (18 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (22 Feb 2021) by Graham Feingold
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Short summary
The distributions of linear trends in total cloud cover and precipitation in 1983–2009 are both characterized by a broadening of the major ascending zone of Hadley circulation around the Maritime Continent. The broadening is driven primarily by the moisture–convection–latent-heat feedback cycle under global warming conditions. Contribution by other climate oscillations is secondary. The reduction of total cloud cover in China in 1957–2005 is driven by the same mechanism.
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