Articles | Volume 21, issue 6
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4431–4451, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4431-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 4431–4451, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-4431-2021

Research article 23 Mar 2021

Research article | 23 Mar 2021

10-year satellite-constrained fluxes of ammonia improve performance of chemistry transport models

Nikolaos Evangeliou et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Nikolaos Evangeliou on behalf of the Authors (16 Jan 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (27 Jan 2021) by Drew Gentner
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (03 Feb 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Feb 2021) by Drew Gentner
AR by Nikolaos Evangeliou on behalf of the Authors (12 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (16 Feb 2021) by Drew Gentner
AR by Nikolaos Evangeliou on behalf of the Authors (17 Feb 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Feb 2021) by Drew Gentner
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Short summary
Ammonia, a substance that has played a key role in sustaining life, has been increasing in the atmosphere, affecting climate and humans. Understanding the reasons for this increase is important for the beneficial use of ammonia. The evolution of satellite products gives us the opportunity to calculate ammonia emissions easier. We calculated global ammonia emissions over the last 10 years, incorporated them into a chemistry model and recorded notable improvement in reproducing observations.
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