Articles | Volume 21, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2781-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-2781-2021
Research article
 | 
24 Feb 2021
Research article |  | 24 Feb 2021

The spring transition of the North Pacific jet and its relation to deep stratosphere-to-troposphere mass transport over western North America

Melissa L. Breeden, Amy H. Butler, John R. Albers, Michael Sprenger, and Andrew O'Neil Langford

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Latest update: 14 Jun 2024
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Short summary
Prior research has found a maximum in deep stratosphere-to-troposphere mass/ozone transport over the western United States in boreal spring, which can enhance surface ozone concentrations, reducing air quality. We find that the winter-to-summer evolution of the north Pacific jet increases the frequency of stratospheric intrusions that drive transport, helping explain the observed maximum. The El Niño–Southern Oscillation affects the timing of the spring jet transition and therefore transport.
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