Articles | Volume 21, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 18393–18411, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-18393-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 18393–18411, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-18393-2021
Research article
17 Dec 2021
Research article | 17 Dec 2021

Ozone deposition impact assessments for forest canopies require accurate ozone flux partitioning on diurnal timescales

Auke J. Visser et al.

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Latest update: 06 Dec 2022
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Short summary
Dry deposition is an important sink for tropospheric ozone that affects ecosystem carbon uptake, but process understanding remains incomplete. We apply a common deposition representation in atmospheric chemistry models and a multi-layer canopy model to multi-year ozone deposition observations. The multi-layer canopy model performs better on diurnal timescales compared to the common approach, leading to a substantially improved simulation of ozone deposition and vegetation ozone impact metrics.
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