Articles | Volume 21, issue 22
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 17017–17029, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-17017-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 17017–17029, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-17017-2021

Research article 24 Nov 2021

Research article | 24 Nov 2021

Origin of water-soluble organic aerosols at the Maïdo high-altitude observatory, Réunion Island, in the tropical Indian Ocean

Sharmine Akter Simu et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-277', Anonymous Referee #1, 24 Jun 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-277', Anonymous Referee #2, 18 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Yuzo Miyazaki on behalf of the Authors (09 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 Sep 2021) by Paul Zieger
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (16 Sep 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Sep 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Oct 2021) by Paul Zieger
AR by Yuzo Miyazaki on behalf of the Authors (11 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (22 Oct 2021) by Paul Zieger
AR by Yuzo Miyazaki on behalf of the Authors (25 Oct 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The tropical Indian Ocean (IO) is expected to be a significant source of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), which is relevant to cloud formation. Our study showed that marine secondary organic formation dominantly contributed to the aerosol WSOC mass at the high-altitude observatory in the southwest IO in the wet season in both marine boundary layer and free troposphere (FT). This suggests that the effect of marine secondary sources is important up to FT, a process missing in climate models.
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