Articles | Volume 21, issue 21
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16293–16317, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16293-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 16293–16317, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-16293-2021
Research article
08 Nov 2021
Research article | 08 Nov 2021

Nighttime and daytime dark oxidation chemistry in wildfire plumes: an observation and model analysis of FIREX-AQ aircraft data

Zachary C. J. Decker et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-267', Anonymous Referee #1, 17 May 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-267', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 Jul 2021
  • AC1: 'Response to referee comments of acp-2021-267', Zachary Decker, 16 Sep 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Zachary Decker on behalf of the Authors (23 Sep 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Sep 2021) by Manabu Shiraiwa
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Short summary
To understand air quality impacts from wildfires, we need an accurate picture of how wildfire smoke changes chemically both day and night as sunlight changes the chemistry of smoke. We present a chemical analysis of wildfire smoke as it changes from midday through the night. We use aircraft observations from the FIREX-AQ field campaign with a chemical box model. We find that even under sunlight typical nighttime chemistry thrives and controls the fate of key smoke plume chemical processes.
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