Articles | Volume 21, issue 19
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14535–14555, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14535-2021
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 14535–14555, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-14535-2021

Research article 01 Oct 2021

Research article | 01 Oct 2021

Origins and characterization of CO and O3 in the African upper troposphere

Victor Lannuque et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on acp-2021-115', Anonymous Referee #2, 16 Apr 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Victor Lannuque, 19 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on acp-2021-115', Anonymous Referee #3, 18 Jun 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Victor Lannuque, 19 Jul 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Victor Lannuque on behalf of the Authors (19 Jul 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Jul 2021) by Eduardo Landulfo
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (23 Jul 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (03 Aug 2021)
ED: Publish as is (04 Aug 2021) by Eduardo Landulfo
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Short summary
The African intertropical troposphere is one of the world areas where the increase in ozone mixing ratio has been most pronounced since 1980 and where high carbon monoxide mixing ratios are found in altitude. In this article, IAGOS aircraft measurements, IASI satellite instrument observations, and SOFT-IO model products are used to explore the seasonal distribution variations and the origin of ozone and carbon monoxide over the African upper troposphere.
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