Articles | Volume 21, issue 13
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10457-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-10457-2021
Research article
 | 
12 Jul 2021
Research article |  | 12 Jul 2021

Empirical evidence for deep convection being a major source of stratospheric ice clouds over North America

Ling Zou, Lars Hoffmann, Sabine Griessbach, Reinhold Spang, and Lunche Wang

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Latest update: 11 Apr 2024
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Short summary
Ice clouds in the lowermost stratosphere (SICs) have important impacts on the radiation budget and climate change. We quantified the occurrence of SICs over North America and analysed its relations with convective systems and gravity waves to investigate potential formation mechanisms of SICs. Deep convection is proved to be the primary factor linked to the occurrence of SICs over North America.
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