Articles | Volume 20, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9997–10014, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9997-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 9997–10014, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9997-2020
Research article
27 Aug 2020
Research article | 27 Aug 2020

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and oxy- and nitro-PAHs in ambient air of the Arctic town Longyearbyen, Svalbard

Tatiana Drotikova et al.

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Short summary
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are not declining in Arctic air despite reductions in global emissions. We studied PAHs and oxy- and nitro-PAHs in gas and particulate phases of Arctic aerosol, collected in autumn 2018 in Longyearbyen, Svalbard. PAHs were found at comparable levels as at other background Scandinavian and European air sampling stations. Statistical analysis confirmed that a coal-fired power plant and vehicle and marine traffic are the main local contributors of PAHs.
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