Articles | Volume 20, issue 16
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9581-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-9581-2020
Research article
 | 
17 Aug 2020
Research article |  | 17 Aug 2020

Glyoxal's impact on dry ammonium salts: fast and reversible surface aerosol browning

David O. De Haan, Lelia N. Hawkins, Kevin Jansen, Hannah G. Welsh, Raunak Pednekar, Alexia de Loera, Natalie G. Jimenez, Margaret A. Tolbert, Mathieu Cazaunau, Aline Gratien, Antonin Bergé, Edouard Pangui, Paola Formenti, and Jean-François Doussin

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Latest update: 22 Jun 2024
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Short summary
When exposed to glyoxal in chamber experiments, dry ammonium or methylammonium sulfate particles turn brown immediately and reversibly without increasing in size. Much less browning was observed on wet aerosol particles, and no browning was observed with sodium sulfate aerosol. While estimated dry aerosol light absorption caused by background glyoxal (70 ppt) is insignificant compared to that of secondary brown carbon overall, in polluted regions this process could be a source of brown carbon.
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