Articles | Volume 20, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 8251–8266, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-8251-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 8251–8266, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-8251-2020

Research article 16 Jul 2020

Research article | 16 Jul 2020

Response of surface shortwave cloud radiative effect to greenhouse gases and aerosols and its impact on summer maximum temperature

Tao Tang et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 1,154 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
888 242 24 1,154 75 12 13
  • HTML: 888
  • PDF: 242
  • XML: 24
  • Total: 1,154
  • Supplement: 75
  • BibTeX: 12
  • EndNote: 13
Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jan 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jan 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 943 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 888 with geography defined and 55 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (final revised paper)

Discussed (preprint)

Latest update: 08 May 2021
Download
Short summary
By using climate simulations, we found that both CO2 and black carbon aerosols could reduce low-level cloud cover, which is mainly due to changes in relative humidity, cloud water, dynamics, and stability. Because the impact of cloud on solar radiation is in effect only during daytime, such cloud reduction could enhance solar heating, thereby raising the daily maximum temperature by 10–50 %, varying by region, which has great implications for extreme climate events and socioeconomic activity.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint