Articles | Volume 20, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 8103–8122, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-8103-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 8103–8122, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-8103-2020
Research article
13 Jul 2020
Research article | 13 Jul 2020

Predictions of the glass transition temperature and viscosity of organic aerosols from volatility distributions

Ying Li et al.

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Short summary
Viscosity is an important property of organic aerosols, but viscosity measurements of ambient organic aerosols are scarce. We developed a method to predict glass transition temperatures using volatility and the atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. The method was applied to field observations of volatility distributions to predict viscosity of ambient organic aerosols, yielding consistent results with ambient particle phase-state measurements and global simulations.
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