Articles | Volume 20, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 805–827, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-805-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 805–827, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-805-2020

Research article 23 Jan 2020

Research article | 23 Jan 2020

Investigation of the global methane budget over 1980–2017 using GFDL-AM4.1

Jian He et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jian He on behalf of the Authors (18 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Nov 2019) by Tim Butler
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (04 Dec 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (13 Dec 2019)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (16 Dec 2019) by Tim Butler
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Short summary
In this work, methane representation in AM4.1 is improved by optimizing CH4 emissions to match surface observations. We find increases in CH4 sources balanced by increases in sinks lead to CH4 stabilization during 1999–2006, and anthropogenic sources (e.g., agriculture, energy, and waste) are more likely major contributors to the renewed growth after 2006. Increases in CH4 emissions and decreases in OH levels during 2008–2015 prolong CH4 lifetime and amplify methane response to emission changes.
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