Articles | Volume 20, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 333–343, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-333-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 333–343, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-333-2020

Research article 09 Jan 2020

Research article | 09 Jan 2020

Modelled effects of temperature gradients and waves on the hydroxyl rotational distribution in ground-based airglow measurements

Christoph Franzen et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Christoph Franzen on behalf of the Authors (27 Aug 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (09 Sep 2019) by William Ward
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (17 Sep 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (19 Sep 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Oct 2019) by William Ward
AR by Christoph Franzen on behalf of the Authors (04 Nov 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (18 Nov 2019) by William Ward
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Short summary
Ground-based observations of the hydroxyl (OH) airglow have indicated that the rotational energy levels may not be in thermal equilibrium with the surrounding gas. Here we use simulations of the OH airglow to show that temperature changes across the extended airglow layer, either climatological or those temporarily caused by atmospheric waves, can mimic this effect for thermalized OH. Thus, these must be considered in order to quantify the non-thermal nature of the OH airglow.
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