Articles | Volume 20, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 16117–16133, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-16117-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 16117–16133, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-16117-2020
Research article
23 Dec 2020
Research article | 23 Dec 2020

Soil–atmosphere exchange flux of total gaseous mercury (TGM) at subtropical and temperate forest catchments

Jun Zhou et al.

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Latest update: 15 May 2022
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Short summary
Mercury (Hg) emissions from natural resources have a large uncertainty, which is mainly derived from the forest. A long-term and multiplot (10) study of soil–air fluxes at subtropical and temperate forests was conducted. Forest soils are an important atmospheric Hg source, especially for subtropical forests. The compensation points imply that the atmospheric Hg concentration plays a critical role in inhibiting Hg emissions from the forest floor. Climate change can enhance soil Hg emissions.
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