Articles | Volume 20, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 15635–15664, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15635-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 15635–15664, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-15635-2020

Research article 17 Dec 2020

Research article | 17 Dec 2020

Measurements to determine the mixing state of black carbon emitted from the 2017–2018 California wildfires and urban Los Angeles

Joseph Ko et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Joseph Ko on behalf of the Authors (10 Jun 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (22 Jun 2020) by Philip Stier
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (02 Jul 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (14 Jul 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Jul 2020) by Philip Stier
AR by Joseph Ko on behalf of the Authors (26 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (13 Oct 2020) by Philip Stier
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Short summary
Black carbon (BC) is the second strongest climate forcing pollutant in the atmosphere, after carbon dioxide. Here, we seek to understand how BC microphysical properties vary with atmospheric contexts, as these properties can influence its radiative forcing. Consistent with previous studies, we found that biomass burning BC had thicker coatings and larger core diameters than fossil fuel BC. We also present evidence to show that atmospheric aging also increases BC coating thickness.
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