Articles | Volume 20, issue 18
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 10831–10844, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10831-2020
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 10831–10844, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10831-2020

Research article 15 Sep 2020

Research article | 15 Sep 2020

What have we missed when studying the impact of aerosols on surface ozone via changing photolysis rates?

Jinhui Gao et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jinhui Gao on behalf of the Authors (15 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (26 Jul 2020) by Kostas Tsigaridis
AR by Jinhui Gao on behalf of the Authors (27 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 Aug 2020) by Kostas Tsigaridis
Download
Short summary
Light extinction of aerosols can decease surface ozone mainly via reducing photochemical production of ozone. However, it also leads to high levels of ozone aloft being entrained down to the surface which partly counteracts the reduction in surface ozone. The impact of aerosols is more sensitive to local ozone, which suggests that while controlling the levels of aerosols, controlling the local ozone precursors is an effective way to suppress the increase of ozone over China at present.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint