Articles | Volume 20, issue 16
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 10091–10109, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10091-2020

Special issue: Sources, propagation, dissipation and impact of gravity waves...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 20, 10091–10109, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-20-10091-2020
Research article
28 Aug 2020
Research article | 28 Aug 2020

Airborne measurements and large-eddy simulations of small-scale gravity waves at the tropopause inversion layer over Scandinavia

Sonja Gisinger et al.

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Cited articles

Baines, P. G.: Topographic effects in stratified flows, Cambridge University Press, 1st edn., 1995. a
Birner, T.: Fine-scale structure of the extratropical tropopause region, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 111, D04104, https://doi.org/10.1029/2005JD006301, 2006. a
Bramberger, M., Dörnbrack, A., Wilms, H., Gemsa, S., Raynor, K., and Sharman, R.: Vertically Propagating Mountain Waves – nA Hazard for High-Flying Aircraft?, J. Appl. Meteorol. Climatol., 57, 1957–1975, https://doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-17-0340.1, 2018. a
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Bögel, W. and Baumann, R.: Test and Calibration of the DLR Falcon Wind Measuring System by Maneuvers, J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech., 8, 5–18, https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0426(1991)008<0005:TACOTD>2.0.CO;2, 1991. a
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Short summary
Gravity waves are an important coupling mechanism in the atmosphere. Measurements by two research aircraft during a mountain wave event over Scandinavia in 2016 revealed changes of the horizontal scales in the vertical velocity field and of momentum fluxes in the vicinity of the tropopause inversion. Idealized simulations revealed the presence of interfacial waves. They are found downstream of the mountain peaks, meaning that they horizontally transport momentum/energy away from their source.
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