Articles | Volume 19, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 835–846, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-835-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 835–846, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-835-2019

Research article 22 Jan 2019

Research article | 22 Jan 2019

Impacts of an intense wildfire smoke episode on surface radiation, energy and carbon fluxes in southwestern British Columbia, Canada

Ian G. McKendry et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Ian McKendry on behalf of the Authors (10 Aug 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Dec 2018) by Markku Kulmala
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Short summary
Wildfire smoke in July 2015 had a significant impact on air quality, radiation, and energy budgets across British Columbia. With lighter smoke, a wetland and forested site showed enhanced photosynthetic activity (taking in carbon dioxide). However, with dense smoke the forested site became a strong source. These results suggest that smoke during the growing season potentially plays an important role in the carbon budget, and this effect will likely increase as climate changes.
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