Articles | Volume 19, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 6535–6549, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-6535-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 6535–6549, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-6535-2019

Research article 17 May 2019

Research article | 17 May 2019

A numerical process study on the rapid transport of stratospheric air down to the surface over western North America and the Tibetan Plateau

Bojan Škerlak et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Michael Sprenger on behalf of the Authors (31 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Apr 2019) by Rolf Müller
RR by Allen Lefohn (24 Apr 2019)
RR by Suzanne L. Gray (03 May 2019)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (03 May 2019) by Rolf Müller
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Short summary
Upper-level fronts are often associated with the rapid transport of stratospheric air to the lower troposphere, leading to significantly enhanced ozone concentrations. This paper considers the multi-scale nature that is needed to bring stratospheric air down to the surface. The final transport step to the surface can be related to frontal zones and the associated vertical winds or to near-horizontal tracer transport followed by entrainment into a growing planetary boundary layer.
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