Articles | Volume 19, issue 1
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 577–601, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-577-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 577–601, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-577-2019

Research article 16 Jan 2019

Research article | 16 Jan 2019

Stratospheric ozone loss in the Arctic winters between 2005 and 2013 derived with ACE-FTS measurements

Debora Griffin et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Kaley Walker on behalf of the Authors (10 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 Jul 2018) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Jul 2018)
RR by Bjoern-Martin Sinnhuber (26 Jul 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (01 Aug 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (02 Aug 2018) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
AR by Kaley Walker on behalf of the Authors (17 Sep 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Sep 2018) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (25 Sep 2018)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (01 Oct 2018) by Jayanarayanan Kuttippurath
AR by Kaley Walker on behalf of the Authors (13 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Ozone in the stratosphere is important to protect the Earth from UV radiation. Using measurements taken by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment satellite between 2005 and 2013, we examine different methods to calculate the ozone loss in the high Arctic and establish the altitude at which most of the ozone is destroyed. Our results show that the different methods agree within the uncertainties. Recommendations are made on which methods are most appropriate to use.
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