Articles | Volume 19, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5737–5751, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5737-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5737–5751, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5737-2019

Research article 30 Apr 2019

Research article | 30 Apr 2019

Investigation of coastal sea-fog formation using the WIBS (wideband integrated bioaerosol sensor) technique

Shane M. Daly et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (19 Dec 2018)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 Jan 2019) by Gordon McFiggans
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (18 Jan 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (25 Jan 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Mar 2019) by Gordon McFiggans
AR by John Sodeau on behalf of the Authors (12 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (13 Mar 2019) by Gordon McFiggans
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Short summary
For a long time sea-salt particles were considered the only types of particles that drive sea-fog formation but recently iodine oxide particles released from kelp have been identified as a source. There are no previous field studies to provide a direct timeline link between molecular iodine release, particle formation and sea-fog formation. The present observations from Cork Harbour provide such a link. A stabilizing mechanism enhancing distribution of iodine in the troposphere is suggested.
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