Articles | Volume 19, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5589–5604, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5589-2019

Special issue: NETCARE (Network on Aerosols and Climate: Addressing Key Uncertainties...

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 5589–5604, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-5589-2019

Research article 30 Apr 2019

Research article | 30 Apr 2019

Characterization of aerosol growth events over Ellesmere Island during the summers of 2015 and 2016

Samantha Tremblay et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Patrick Hayes on behalf of the Authors (06 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Nov 2018) by Lynn M. Russell
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Nov 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (31 Dec 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 Jan 2019) by Lynn M. Russell
AR by Patrick Hayes on behalf of the Authors (25 Jan 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (28 Jan 2019) by Lynn M. Russell
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Short summary
Atmospheric aerosols, tiny airborne particles, have an important impact on climate. However, a lack of understanding of the chemistry of aerosols is one of the largest contributors to uncertainty in predictions of climate change. Measurements of aerosols were carried out in the Arctic at Eureka Station, Canada, to better understand what role aerosols play in this fragile environment. It is found that organic aerosols, possibly originating from marine emissions, are ubiquitous during summertime.
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