Articles | Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595–4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595–4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019

Research article 08 Apr 2019

Research article | 08 Apr 2019

Lidar measurements of thin laminations within Arctic clouds

Emily M. McCullough et al.

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Short summary
Very thin (<10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (CRL) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL; Eureka, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic). The laminations can last longer than 24 h and are often associated with precipitation and atmospheric stability. This has implications for our understanding of cloud internal structure and processes.
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