Articles | Volume 19, issue 7
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595–4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 4595–4614, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-4595-2019

Research article 08 Apr 2019

Research article | 08 Apr 2019

Lidar measurements of thin laminations within Arctic clouds

Emily M. McCullough et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Emily McCullough on behalf of the Authors (29 Dec 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Jan 2019) by Chak K. Chan
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (13 Feb 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (28 Feb 2019) by Chak K. Chan
AR by Emily McCullough on behalf of the Authors (09 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (11 Mar 2019) by Chak K. Chan
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Short summary
Very thin (<10 m) laminations within Arctic clouds have been observed in all seasons using the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar (CRL) at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL; Eureka, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic). The laminations can last longer than 24 h and are often associated with precipitation and atmospheric stability. This has implications for our understanding of cloud internal structure and processes.
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