Articles | Volume 19, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 15673–15690, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-15673-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 15673–15690, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-15673-2019
Research article
20 Dec 2019
Research article | 20 Dec 2019

Detection of tar brown carbon with a single particle soot photometer (SP2)

Joel C. Corbin and Martin Gysel-Beer

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Short summary
We review the literature to refine the definition of "tar balls" (or tar particles). Then, using a marine-engine data set, we show that a standard SP2 can identify tar particles in two ways, as evaporating and non-incandescing (30 % of tar particles by number) or incandescing particles which scatter more light than soot at incandescence (70 % of tar particles by number). To our knowledge, no other technique can provide in situ, real-time evidence for the presence of tar particles in an aerosol.
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