Articles | Volume 19, issue 24
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 15339–15352, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-15339-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 15339–15352, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-15339-2019

Research article 17 Dec 2019

Research article | 17 Dec 2019

Inferring the anthropogenic NOx emission trend over the United States during 2003–2017 from satellite observations: was there a flattening of the emission trend after the Great Recession?

Jianfeng Li and Yuhang Wang

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Short summary
NO2 tropospheric vertical columns (TVCDs) and surface concentrations are widely used proxies for NOx emission variations. Through model and observation analyses, we find that satellite NO2 TVCDs provide much better information on anthropogenic NOx emission variations over urban than rural regions. NO2 surface observations, satellite column datasets, and EPA anthropogenic NOx emissions show consistent annual variations over urban regions of the United States with a continuous decrease after 2011.
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