Articles | Volume 19, issue 17
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-11401-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-11401-2019
Research article
 | 
10 Sep 2019
Research article |  | 10 Sep 2019

Local air pollution from oil rig emissions observed during the airborne DACCIWA campaign

Vanessa Brocchi, Gisèle Krysztofiak, Adrien Deroubaix, Greta Stratmann, Daniel Sauer, Hans Schlager, Konrad Deetz, Guillaume Dayma, Claude Robert, Stéphane Chevrier, and Valéry Catoire

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Latest update: 13 Jul 2024
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Short summary
This study reports the first flaring in situ measurements in southern West Africa. According to the measurements, oil rig flaring plumes in Ghana lead to increases in NO2 and aerosols but not always in CO and not in SO2. Flaring measurements can be reproduced using FLEXPART model, adjusting both the emission flux and the injection height. The DACCIWA satellite flaring inventory provides a reasonable estimate of flaring emission.
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