Articles | Volume 19, issue 2
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1013–1026, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1013-2019
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 19, 1013–1026, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-19-1013-2019

Research article 25 Jan 2019

Research article | 25 Jan 2019

Speciated and total emission factors of particulate organics from burning western US wildland fuels and their dependence on combustion efficiency

Coty N. Jen et al.

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Latest update: 24 Oct 2021
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Short summary
Wildfires in the western US are occurring more frequently and burning larger land areas. Smoke from these fires will play a greater role in regional air quality and atmospheric chemistry than in the past. To help fire and climate modelers and atmospheric experimentalists better understand how smoke impacts the environment, we have separated, identified, classified, and quantified the thousands of organic compounds found in smoke and related their amounts emitted to fire conditions.
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