Articles | Volume 18, issue 13
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9457-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9457-2018
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06 Jul 2018
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 06 Jul 2018

The diurnal cycle of cloud profiles over land and ocean between 51° S and 51° N, seen by the CATS spaceborne lidar from the International Space Station

Vincent Noel, Hélène Chepfer, Marjolaine Chiriaco, and John Yorks

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Latest update: 19 Jul 2024
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Short summary
From 3 years of observations from the CATS lidar on the International Space Station we document the daily cycle of the vertical distribution of clouds. This is the first time this is documented over several continents and oceans using finely resolved measurements on a near-global scale from a single instrument. We show that other instruments observing clouds from space, like CALIPSO, document extremes of the daily cycle over ocean and closer to the average over land.
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