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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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ACP | Articles | Volume 18, issue 13
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9425–9440, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9425-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 9425–9440, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-9425-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Jul 2018

Research article | 05 Jul 2018

Disentangling the rates of carbonyl sulfide (COS) production and consumption and their dependency on soil properties across biomes and land use types

Aurore Kaisermann et al.

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Short summary
Soils simultaneously produce and consume the trace gas carbonyl sulfide (COS). To understand the role of these processes, we developed a method to estimate their contribution to the soil–atmosphere COS exchange. Exchange was principally driven by consumption, but the influence of production increased at higher temperatures, lower soil moisture contents and lower COS concentrations. Across the soils studied, we found a strong interaction between soil nitrogen and COS exchange.
Soils simultaneously produce and consume the trace gas carbonyl sulfide (COS). To understand the...
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