Articles | Volume 18, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 7709–7720, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-7709-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 7709–7720, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-7709-2018

Research article 01 Jun 2018

Research article | 01 Jun 2018

How much of the global aerosol optical depth is found in the boundary layer and free troposphere?

Quentin Bourgeois et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 2,312 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,489 785 38 2,312 37 62
  • HTML: 1,489
  • PDF: 785
  • XML: 38
  • Total: 2,312
  • BibTeX: 37
  • EndNote: 62
Views and downloads (calculated since 16 Nov 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 16 Nov 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 2,294 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 2,281 with geography defined and 13 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 21 Oct 2021
Download
Short summary
The altitude of aerosols is crucial as they can impact cloud formation and radiation. In this study, satellite observations have been used to characterize the global aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The free troposphere contributes 39 % to the global AOD during daytime. Overall, the results have implications for the description of budgets, sources, sinks and transport of aerosol particles as presently described in the atmospheric model.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint