Articles | Volume 18, issue 10
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 7709–7720, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-7709-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 7709–7720, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-7709-2018

Research article 01 Jun 2018

Research article | 01 Jun 2018

How much of the global aerosol optical depth is found in the boundary layer and free troposphere?

Quentin Bourgeois et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Quentin Bourgeois on behalf of the Authors (02 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (12 Mar 2018) by Anne Perring
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (20 Mar 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Apr 2018) by Anne Perring
AR by Quentin Bourgeois on behalf of the Authors (02 May 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 May 2018) by Anne Perring
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Short summary
The altitude of aerosols is crucial as they can impact cloud formation and radiation. In this study, satellite observations have been used to characterize the global aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The free troposphere contributes 39 % to the global AOD during daytime. Overall, the results have implications for the description of budgets, sources, sinks and transport of aerosol particles as presently described in the atmospheric model.
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