Articles | Volume 18, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 6585–6599, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-6585-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 6585–6599, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-6585-2018

Research article 08 May 2018

Research article | 08 May 2018

Meteorological controls on atmospheric particulate pollution during hazard reduction burns

Giovanni Di Virgilio et al.

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Latest update: 06 May 2021
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Short summary
Hazard reduction burns (HRBs) may prevent wildfires, but both generate PM2.5 air pollution. We identify the meteorological factors linked to high PM2.5 pollution & assess how they differ between HRB days with low vs. high PM2.5. Boundary layer, cloud cover, temperature & wind speed strongly influence PM2.5, with these factors being more variable & higher in magnitude during mornings & evenings of HRB days when PM2.5 remains low, indicating how HRB timing can be altered to reduce air pollution.
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