Articles | Volume 18, issue 9
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 6381–6392, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-6381-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 6381–6392, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-6381-2018

Research article 04 May 2018

Research article | 04 May 2018

Triple oxygen isotopes indicate urbanization affects sources of nitrate in wet and dry atmospheric deposition

David M. Nelson et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by David Nelson on behalf of the Authors (29 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (31 Mar 2018) by Leiming Zhang
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (15 Apr 2018)
ED: Publish as is (18 Apr 2018) by Leiming Zhang
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Short summary
Atmospheric nitrate may be produced locally and/or come from upwind regions. To address this issue we measured oxygen and nitrogen isotopes of wet and dry nitrate deposition at nearby urban and rural sites. Our results suggest that, relative to nitrate in wet deposition in urban environments and wet and dry deposition in rural environments, nitrate in dry deposition in urban environments results from local NOx emissions more so than wet deposition, which is transported longer distances.
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