Articles | Volume 18, issue 8
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5821–5846, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5821-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 5821–5846, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-5821-2018

Research article 26 Apr 2018

Research article | 26 Apr 2018

Aerosol midlatitude cyclone indirect effects in observations and high-resolution simulations

Daniel T. McCoy et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Daniel McCoy on behalf of the Authors (30 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 Dec 2017) by Graham Feingold
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (18 Dec 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (24 Dec 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (26 Dec 2017)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (30 Dec 2017) by Graham Feingold
AR by Daniel McCoy on behalf of the Authors (16 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Mar 2018) by Graham Feingold
AR by Daniel McCoy on behalf of the Authors (03 Apr 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (05 Apr 2018) by Graham Feingold
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Short summary
Here we use a combination of global convection-permitting models, satellite observations and the Holuhraun volcanic eruption to demonstrate that aerosol enhances the cloud liquid content and brightness of midlatitude cyclones. This is important because the strength of anthropogenic radiative forcing is uncertain, leading to uncertainty in the climate sensitivity consistent with observed temperature record.
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