Articles | Volume 18, issue 4
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2809–2820, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2809-2018
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 18, 2809–2820, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-2809-2018
Research article
27 Feb 2018
Research article | 27 Feb 2018

Importance of sulfate radical anion formation and chemistry in heterogeneous OH oxidation of sodium methyl sulfate, the smallest organosulfate

Kai Chung Kwong et al.

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Short summary
To date, it remains unclear how organosulfates evolve over time in the atmosphere. We demonstrate that heterogeneous OH oxidation of sodium methyl sulfate, the smallest organosulfate found in atmospheric aerosols, is efficient. The oxidation can lead to the formation of sulfate radical anion and produce inorganic sulfate. In addition to OH radicals, sulfate radical anion chemistry can play a role in determining the evolution of sodium methyl sulfate and other organosulfates during oxidation.
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